Rethinking the origin of multicellularity: Where do epithelia come from? (Comment on DOI 10.1002/bies.201100187).

Bosch, Thomas (2012) Rethinking the origin of multicellularity: Where do epithelia come from? (Comment on DOI 10.1002/bies.201100187). BioEssays, 34 (10). pp. 826-827. DOI 10.1002/bies.201200104.

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Abstract

Evolution happens slowly; and it also happens in major transitions. One of the earliest transitions involved the capture of a bacterium that became the mitochondrion of the eukaryotic cell. Another major transition resulted in multicellularity and the appearance of organisms with at least a few distinct cell types. Multicellularity has evolved repeatedly from independent unicellular lineages. In any multicellular body this requires coordinated developmental processes and controlled expression of cell type‐specific genes. The primary building block providing for complex differentiation is the epithelium. Epithelia are sheet‐like arrangements of “polarized” cells that have an apical surface with secretory vesicles. Furthermore, they use belt‐like junctions for cell adhesion along their adjacent surfaces, and are attached to an extracellular matrix on their basal side (Fig. 1).

Document Type: Article
Research affiliation: OceanRep > The Future Ocean - Cluster of Excellence
Kiel University
Refereed: Yes
Open Access Journal?: No
DOI etc.: 10.1002/bies.201200104
ISSN: 0265-9247
Projects: Future Ocean
Date Deposited: 14 May 2014 10:19
Last Modified: 19 Aug 2019 09:51
URI: http://oceanrep.geomar.de/id/eprint/23864

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