Genera-specific immunofluorescence labeling of ammonia oxidizers with polyclonal antibodies recognizing both subunits of the ammonia monooxygenase.

Fiencke, Claudia and Bock, E. (2004) Genera-specific immunofluorescence labeling of ammonia oxidizers with polyclonal antibodies recognizing both subunits of the ammonia monooxygenase. Microbial Ecology, 47 (4). pp. 374-384. DOI 10.1007/s00248-003-1009-8.

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Abstract

Polyclonal antibodies that recognize the two subunits AmoA and AmoB of the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) were applied to identify ammonia-oxidizing bacteria by immunofluorescence (IF) labeling in pure, mixed, and enriched cultures. The antibodies against the AmoA were produced using a synthetic peptide of the AmoA of Nitrosomonas eutropha, whereas the antibodies against the AmoB had been developed previously is against the whole B-subunit of the AMO [Pinck et al. (2001) Appl Environ Microbiol 67:118–124]. Using IF labeling, the AmoA antibodies were specific for the detection of all species of the genus Nitrosomonas. In contrast, the antiserum against AmoB labeled all genera of ammonia oxidizers of the β-subclass of Proteobacteria (Nitrosomonas, Nitrosospira, Nitrosolobus, and Nitrosovibrio). The fluorescence signals of the AmoA antibodies were spread all over the cells, whereas the signals of the AmoB antibodies were associated with the cytoplasmic membranes. The specificity of the reactions of the antisera with ammonia oxidizers were proven in pure and mixed cultures, and the characteristic IF labeling and the morphology of the cells enabled their identification at the genus level. The genus-specific IF labeling could be used to identify ammonia oxidizers enriched from various habitats. In enrichment cultures of natural sandstone, cells of the genera Nitrosomonas, Nitrosovibrio, and Nitrosospira were detected. Members of the genus Nitrosovibrio and Nitrosolobus were most prominent in enriched garden soil samples, whereas members of the genus Nitrosomonas dominated in enriched activated sludge. The antibodies caused only slight background fluorescence on sandstone and soil particles compared to oligonucleotide probes, which could not be used to detect ammonia oxidizers on these materials because of strong nonspecific fluorescence.

Document Type: Article
Keywords: Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria
Refereed: Yes
DOI etc.: 10.1007/s00248-003-1009-8
ISSN: 0095-3628
Projects: Laptev Sea System, Permafrost
Date Deposited: 28 Jan 2015 10:23
Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 10:23
URI: http://oceanrep.geomar.de/id/eprint/27150

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