Cephalopod Fauna of the Scotia Sea at South Georgia: Potential for Commercial Exploitation and Possible Consequences.

Rodhouse, P. G. (1990) Cephalopod Fauna of the Scotia Sea at South Georgia: Potential for Commercial Exploitation and Possible Consequences. In: Antarctic Ecosystems. , ed. by Kerry, K. R. and Hempel, Gotthilf. Springer, Berlin, Germany, pp. 289-298. ISBN 978-3-642-84076-0 DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-84074-6_33.

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Abstract

A collection of cephalopods from the British Antarctic Survey’s Offshore Biological Programme is described and the cephalopod prey of vertebrate predators at South Georgia is reviewed. Comparison of these data indicates that predators catch larger specimens and a greater diversity of species than nets. There are also differences between samples from different types of net. The RMT 25, the largest research net used to date, has caught most of the species thought to occur in the Scotia Sea but specimens are generally smaller than those taken by predators. Cephalopods which are thought to have potential commercial value are Martialia hyadesi, Kondakovia longimana, Moroteuthis ingens, M. knipovitchi, M. robsoni and Gonatus antarcticus. Other possibilities include species of brachioteuthid, psychroteuthid and neoteuthid. It is likely that Antarctic stocks will be sensitive to exploitation and liable to dramatic fluctuations if overfished. The possible consequences of commercial exploitation of cephalopods for the reproductive success of the vertebrate predators, which prey on cephalopods in the Scotia Sea, are examined.

Document Type: Book chapter
Refereed: Yes
Open Access Journal?: No
DOI etc.: 10.1007/978-3-642-84074-6_33
Projects: CephLit
Contribution Number:
ProjectNumber
CephLit1771
Date Deposited: 13 Jan 2017 10:17
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2020 12:05
URI: http://oceanrep.geomar.de/id/eprint/35169

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