Oil in Venezuela: Triggering Conflicts or Ensuring Stability? A Historical Comparative Analysis.

Kuhn, A. (2011) Oil in Venezuela: Triggering Conflicts or Ensuring Stability? A Historical Comparative Analysis. Politics & Policy, 39 (4). pp. 583-611. DOI 10.1111/j.1747-1346.2011.00305.x.

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Abstract

Contrary to the presumption of the resource curse hypothesis, the oil exporter Venezuela has long been one of the most stable and conflict‐free countries in Latin America. The article analyzes this deviant case by employing a context‐sensitive approach which shows that the link between oil and internal conflicts or stability cannot be understood without considering crucial resource‐specific and non‐resource‐specific contextual conditions. The findings of this in‐depth case study suggest that the interplay of the relatively high oil abundance per capita, the geographical location of the oil reserves, multidimensional redistribution policies, specific political–institutional settings, and behavioral patterns of political elites best explains the generally low level of violent conflicts in Venezuela. These findings are further confirmed by a diachronic comparative analysis undertaken in the second part of this article. It is demonstrated that temporary increases in low‐level violence can be explained by historical shifts relating to several of the outlined conditions.

Document Type: Article
Research affiliation: OceanRep > The Future Ocean - Cluster of Excellence > FO-R02
OceanRep > The Future Ocean - Cluster of Excellence
Refereed: Yes
Open Access Journal?: No
DOI etc.: 10.1111/j.1747-1346.2011.00305.x
ISSN: 1555-5623
Date Deposited: 10 Oct 2017 14:52
Last Modified: 28 Mar 2019 12:53
URI: http://oceanrep.geomar.de/id/eprint/39852

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