Hydrothermal chimneys host habitat-specific microbial communities: analogues for studying the possible impact of mining seafloor massive sulfide deposits.

Han, Yuchen, Gonnella, Giorgio, Adam, Nicole, Schippers, Axel, Burkhardt, Lia, Kurtz, Stefan, Schwarz-Schampera, Ulrich, Franke, Henrike and Perner, Mirjam (2018) Hydrothermal chimneys host habitat-specific microbial communities: analogues for studying the possible impact of mining seafloor massive sulfide deposits. Open Access Scientific Reports, 8 (1). p. 10386. DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-28613-5.

[img]
Preview
Text
s41598-018-28613-5.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0.

Download (3485Kb) | Preview
[img] Text
41598_2018_28613_MOESM1_ESM.docx - Supplemental Material

Download (1477Kb)
[img] Other (Excel File)
41598_2018_28613_MOESM2_ESM.xlsx - Supplemental Material

Download (8Mb)
[img] Other (Excel File)
41598_2018_28613_MOESM3_ESM.xlsx - Supplemental Material

Download (0b)
[img] Other (Excel File)
41598_2018_28613_MOESM4_ESM.xlsx - Supplemental Material

Download (8Mb)
[img] Other (Excel File)
41598_2018_28613_MOESM5_ESM.xlsx - Supplemental Material

Download (1162Kb)
[img] Other (Excel File)
41598_2018_28613_MOESM6_ESM.xlsx - Supplemental Material

Download (295Kb)
[img] Other (Excel File)
41598_2018_28613_MOESM7_ESM.xlsx - Supplemental Material

Download (62Kb)

Supplementary data:

Abstract

To assess the risk that mining of seafloor massive sulfides (SMS) from extinct hydrothermal vent environments has for changing the ecosystem irreversibly, we sampled SMS analogous habitats from the Kairei and the Pelagia vent fields along the Indian Ridge. In total 19.8 million 16S rRNA tags from 14 different sites were analyzed and the microbial communities were compared with each other and with publicly available data sets from other marine environments. The chimneys appear to provide habitats for microorganisms that are not found or only detectable in very low numbers in other marine habitats. The chimneys also host rare organisms and may function as a vital part of the ocean's seed bank. Many of the reads from active and inactive chimney samples were clustered into OTUs, with low or no resemblance to known species. Since we are unaware of the chemical reactions catalyzed by these unknown organisms, the impact of this diversity loss and bio-geo-coupling is hard to predict. Given that chimney structures can be considered SMS analogues, removal of sulfide deposits from the seafloor in the Kairei and Pelagia fields will most likely alter microbial compositions and affect element cycling in the benthic regions and probably beyond.

Document Type: Article
Keywords: Microbial ecology, Water microbiology, seafloor, massive sulfide deposits, mining
Research affiliation: OceanRep > GEOMAR > FB2 Marine Biogeochemistry > FB2-MG Marine Geosystems
Refereed: Yes
Open Access Journal?: Yes
DOI etc.: 10.1038/s41598-018-28613-5
ISSN: 2045-2322
Date Deposited: 17 Jul 2018 09:33
Last Modified: 24 May 2019 08:57
URI: http://oceanrep.geomar.de/id/eprint/43677

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...