Antarctic sub-shelf melt rates via PICO.

Reese, Ronja, Albrecht, Torsten, Mengel, Matthias, Asay-Davis, Xylar and Winkelmann, Ricarda (2018) Antarctic sub-shelf melt rates via PICO. Open Access The Cryosphere, 12 (6). pp. 1969-1985. DOI 10.5194/tc-12-1969-2018.

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Abstract

Ocean-induced melting below ice shelves is one of the dominant drivers for mass loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet at present. An appropriate representation of sub-shelf melt rates is therefore essential for model simulations of marine-based ice sheet evolution. Continental-scale ice sheet models often rely on simple melt-parameterizations, in particular for long-term simulations, when fully coupled ice–ocean interaction becomes computationally too expensive. Such parameterizations can account for the influence of the local depth of the ice-shelf draft or its slope on melting. However, they do not capture the effect of ocean circulation underneath the ice shelf. Here we present the Potsdam Ice-shelf Cavity mOdel (PICO), which simulates the vertical overturning circulation in ice-shelf cavities and thus enables the computation of sub-shelf melt rates consistent with this circulation. PICO is based on an ocean box model that coarsely resolves ice shelf cavities and uses a boundary layer melt formulation. We implement it as a module of the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) and evaluate its performance under present-day conditions of the Southern Ocean. We identify a set of parameters that yield two-dimensional melt rate fields that qualitatively reproduce the typical pattern of comparably high melting near the grounding line and lower melting or refreezing towards the calving front. PICO captures the wide range of melt rates observed for Antarctic ice shelves, with an average of about 0.1m a−1 for cold sub-shelf cavities, for example, underneath Ross or Ronne ice shelves, to 16m a−1 for warm cavities such as in the Amundsen Sea region. This makes PICO a computationally feasible and more physical alternative to melt parameterizations purely based on ice draft geometry.

Document Type: Article
Refereed: Yes
Open Access Journal?: Yes
DOI etc.: 10.5194/tc-12-1969-2018
ISSN: 1994-0416
Projects: PalMod in-kind
Date Deposited: 14 Sep 2018 09:20
Last Modified: 17 Dec 2018 08:23
URI: http://oceanrep.geomar.de/id/eprint/44307

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