Fueled by methane: deep-sea sponges from asphalt seeps gain their nutrition from methane-oxidizing symbionts.

Rubin-Blum, Maxim , Antony, Chakkiath Paul, Sayavedra, Lizbeth, Martínez-Pérez, Clara , Birgel, Daniel, Peckmann, Jörn , Wu, Yu-Chen, Cardenas, Paco , MacDonald, Ian, Marcon, Yann , Sahling, Heiko, Hentschel, Ute and Dubilier, Nicole (2019) Fueled by methane: deep-sea sponges from asphalt seeps gain their nutrition from methane-oxidizing symbionts. Open Access The ISME Journal, 13 (5). pp. 1209-1225. DOI 10.1038/s41396-019-0346-7.

[img]
Preview
Text
s41396-019-0346-7.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0.

Download (5Mb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
41396_2019_346_MOESM1_ESM.pdf - Supplemental Material
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0.

Download (2272Kb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
41396_2019_346_MOESM2_ESM.pdf - Supplemental Material
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0.

Download (52Mb) | Preview
[img] Other (Excel File)
41396_2019_346_MOESM3_ESM.xlsx - Supplemental Material
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0.

Download (13Kb)
[img] Other (Excel File)
41396_2019_346_MOESM4_ESM.xlsx - Supplemental Material
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0.

Download (12Kb)

Supplementary data:

Abstract

Sponges host a remarkable diversity of microbial symbionts, however, the benefit their microbes provide is rarely understood. Here, we describe two new sponge species from deep-sea asphalt seeps and show that they live in a nutritional symbiosis with methane-oxidizing (MOX) bacteria. Metagenomics and imaging analyses revealed unusually high amounts of MOX symbionts in hosts from a group previously assumed to have low microbial abundances. These symbionts belonged to the Marine Methylotrophic Group 2 clade. They are host-specific and likely vertically transmitted, based on their presence in sponge embryos and streamlined genomes, which lacked genes typical of related free-living MOX. Moreover, genes known to play a role in host–symbiont interactions, such as those that encode eukaryote-like proteins, were abundant and expressed. Methane assimilation by the symbionts was one of the most highly expressed metabolic pathways in the sponges. Molecular and stable carbon isotope patterns of lipids confirmed that methane-derived carbon was incorporated into the hosts. Our results revealed that two species of sponges, although distantly related, independently established highly specific, nutritional symbioses with two closely related methanotrophs. This convergence in symbiont acquisition underscores the strong selective advantage for these sponges in harboring MOX bacteria in the food-limited deep sea.

Document Type: Article
Funder compliance: info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/679849
Keywords: TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES; CARBON ISOTOPIC FRACTIONATION; METHANOTROPHIC BACTERIA; SINGLE-CELL; COMMUNITIES; METABOLISM; DIVERSITY; EVOLUTION; INSIGHTS; MICROBIOME
Research affiliation: MARUM
OceanRep > GEOMAR > FB3 Marine Ecology > FB3-MI Marine Microbiology
AWI
Refereed: Yes
Open Access Journal?: No
DOI etc.: 10.1038/s41396-019-0346-7
ISSN: 1751-7362
Projects: SponGES
Expeditions/Models/Experiments:
Date Deposited: 16 Jan 2019 09:31
Last Modified: 02 May 2019 13:31
URI: http://oceanrep.geomar.de/id/eprint/45360

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...