Specificity of resistance and geographic patterns of virulence in a vertebrate host-parasite system.

Piecyk, Agnes , Roth, Olivia and Kalbe, Martin (2019) Specificity of resistance and geographic patterns of virulence in a vertebrate host-parasite system. Open Access BMC Evolutionary Biology, 19 . Art.Nr. 80. DOI 10.1186/s12862-019-1406-3.

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Supplementary data:

Abstract

Background
Host genotype - parasite genotype co-evolutionary dynamics are influenced by local biotic and abiotic environmental conditions. This results in spatially heterogeneous selection among host populations. How such heterogeneous selection influences host resistance, parasite infectivity and virulence remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that different co-evolutionary trajectories of a vertebrate host-parasite association result in specific virulence patterns when assessed on a large geographic scale. We used two reference host populations of three-spined sticklebacks and nine strains of their specific cestode parasite Schistocephalus solidus from across the Northern Hemisphere for controlled infection experiments. Host and parasite effects on infection phenotypes including host immune gene expression were determined.
Results

S. solidus strains grew generally larger in hosts coming from a population with high parasite diversity and low S. solidus prevalence (DE hosts). Hosts from a population with low parasite diversity and high S. solidus prevalence (NO hosts) were better able to control the parasite’s growth, regardless of the origin of the parasite. Host condition and immunological parameters converged upon infection and parasite growth showed the same geographic pattern in both host types.
Conclusion

Our results suggest that NO sticklebacks evolved resistance against a variety of S. solidus strains, whereas DE sticklebacks are less resistant against S. solidus. Our data provide evidence that differences in parasite prevalence can cause immunological heterogeneity and that parasite size, a proxy for virulence and resistance, is, on a geographic scale, determined by main effects of the host and the parasite and less by an interaction of both genotypes.

Document Type: Article
Additional Information: After publication of the original article [1], the authors have notified us that the incorrect version of Fig. 4 was used. Below you can find the both incorrect and correct versions of the figure. The original article has been corrected.
Keywords: Host-parasite interaction; immunological heterogeneity; virulence; stickleback; Schistocephalus solidus
Research affiliation: OceanRep > GEOMAR > FB3 Marine Ecology > FB3-EV Marine Evolutionary Ecology
Refereed: Yes
Open Access Journal?: Yes
DOI etc.: 10.1186/s12862-019-1406-3
ISSN: 1471-2148
Related URLs:
Projects: MALEPREG
Date Deposited: 27 Mar 2019 11:59
Last Modified: 27 May 2019 08:11
URI: http://oceanrep.geomar.de/id/eprint/46225

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