On the penetration of anthropogenic CO2 into the North Atlantic Ocean.

Körtzinger, Arne , Mintrop, Ludger and Duinker, Jan C. (1998) On the penetration of anthropogenic CO2 into the North Atlantic Ocean. Open Access Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 103 (C9). pp. 18681-18689. DOI 10.1029/98JC01737.

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Abstract

The penetration of anthropogenic or “excess” CO2 into the North Atlantic Ocean was studied along WOCE‐WHP section A2 from 49°N/11°W to 43°N/49°W using hydrographic data obtained during the METEOR cruise 30–2 in October/November 1994. A backcalculation technique based on measurements of temperature, salinity, oxygen, alkalinity, and total dissolved inorganic carbon was applied to identify the excess CO2. Everywhere along the transect surface water contained almost its full component of anthropogenic CO2 ( ∼62 μmol kg−1). Furthermore, anthropogenic CO2 has penetrated through the entire water column in the western basin of the North Atlantic Ocean. Even in the deepest waters (5000 m) of the western basin a mean value of 10.4 μmol kg−1 excess CO2 was calculated. The maximum penetration depth of excess CO2 in the eastern basin of the North Atlantic Ocean was ∼3500 m with values falling below 5 μmol kg−1 in greater depths. These results compare well with distributions of carbontetrachloride. They are also in agreement with the current understanding of the role of the “global ocean conveyor belt” for the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 into the deep ocean.

Document Type: Article
Research affiliation: OceanRep > GEOMAR > FB2 Marine Biogeochemistry > FB2-CH Chemical Oceanography
Refereed: Yes
Open Access Journal?: No
DOI etc.: 10.1029/98JC01737
ISSN: 2169-9275
Expeditions/Models/Experiments:
Date Deposited: 18 Feb 2008 17:24
Last Modified: 30 Apr 2018 11:00
URI: http://oceanrep.geomar.de/id/eprint/5315

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