Time-dependent, anisotropic pore structure and soil strength in a 10-year period after intensive tractor wheeling under conservation and conventional tillage.

Peng, X. H. and Horn, Rainer (2008) Time-dependent, anisotropic pore structure and soil strength in a 10-year period after intensive tractor wheeling under conservation and conventional tillage. Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, 171 (6). pp. 936-944. DOI 10.1002/jpln.200700084.

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Abstract

Any soil deformation induced by agricultural machinery is transmitted three-dimensionally and the "kneading effect" of tractor wheeling further rearranges soil particles and aggregates anisotropically. In this work, we investigated how heterogeneous soil structure remained 10 y after a complete wheeling of fields in 1995 with a single pass of 2 x 2.5 Mg and 6 x 5 Mg on silty loam Luvisol derived from loess. Control plots received no tractor wheeling. We also analyzed how soil physical properties responded to the tractor wheeling under two management systems: continuous conservation tillage (chisel plow = CS) with mulch cover and conventional tillage (plowing to 25 cm depth annually = CT).We compared three sampling dates: done before wheeling in 1995, after wheeling in 1995, and in 2004. Results showed that applying tractor wheeling in 1995 not only reduced total soil-pore volume but also increased soil strength as expressed by precompression stress. The reduction of total pore volume at 30 cm depth was more pronounced in CS than in CT After 10 y of continuous use of the two tillage systems, the precompression stress of the wheeled soils was greater in the vertical direction than in the horizontal direction. This anisotropy of soil strength and its load dependency were also more pronounced in CS than in CT. The effect of wheeling on the fluxes of gas and water was covered up by the effects of biochannels, causing a prevailing vertical passage. From this study, we conclude that heavy, agricultural machinery causes soil degradation, which is more evident in CS than in CT

Document Type: Article
Keywords: conservation tillageconventional tillage soil compaction soil strength soil structure mechanical-properties organic soils arable soils compaction persistence management germany region
Research affiliation: Kiel University
OceanRep > The Future Ocean - Cluster of Excellence
Refereed: Yes
Open Access Journal?: No
DOI etc.: 10.1002/jpln.200700084
ISSN: 1436-8730
Projects: Future Ocean
Date Deposited: 11 Feb 2011 12:10
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2019 21:57
URI: http://oceanrep.geomar.de/id/eprint/9631

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