A Steady-State Comparative Simulation of Dissolved Organic Matter Cycling in Idealized Oceanic, Coastal, and Estuarine Surface Waters: The Role of the Planktonic Community Structure and Nutrient Loading.

Keller, David and Hood, Raleigh (2010) A Steady-State Comparative Simulation of Dissolved Organic Matter Cycling in Idealized Oceanic, Coastal, and Estuarine Surface Waters: The Role of the Planktonic Community Structure and Nutrient Loading. [Talk] In: IMBER IMBIZO ll “Integrating biogeochemistry and ecosystems in a changing ocean: Regional comparisons”. , 10.-14.10 2010, Crete, Greece .

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Abstract

Dissolved organic matter (DOM) constitutes one of the Earth’s largest reservoirs of bioreactive elements (C, N, P) and plays an important role in global biogeochemical cycles, yet the composition and cycling of DOM is still poorly understood. As a result, most marine ecosystem and biogeochemical models include highly simplified representations of DOM cycling, if at all. In order to better understand this cycling we constructed an ecosystem model that constrains both dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) cycling. Using this model we studied how the planktonic community structure affects biogeochemical cycling in idealized oceanic, coastal, and estuarine surface waters. The results of this comparative study indicate that differences in the community structures of these systems have a large influence on the sources and cycling of DOM. In the oceanic simulations bacteria were particularly important for mediating DOM cycling because they were the primary agents that control nutrient recycling and supply. In contrast, in the estuarine simulations zooplankton had the most influence on DOM production due to the impact of their grazing and excretion, with grazing processes being particularly important. In addition, DOM cycling was generally less dependant on interactions between phytoplankton, zooplankton, and bacteria in the estuarine case because there was more DOM loading to account for terrestrial sources. The coastal simulations were somewhere in between, i.e., small zooplankton and bacteria both had a strong influence on DOM cycling because they were both important agents that controlled nutrient recycling and supply.

Document Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Talk)
Keywords: Biological Oceanography; Food Webs; Biogeochemistry
Research affiliation: OceanRep > GEOMAR > FB2 Marine Biogeochemistry > FB2-BM Biogeochemical Modeling
Date Deposited: 15 Dec 2011 09:12
Last Modified: 23 Feb 2012 06:31
URI: http://oceanrep.geomar.de/id/eprint/12907

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