Turbidity Maximum Entrapment of Phytoplankton in the Chesapeake Bay.

Keller, David , Lee, Dong Y. and Hood, Raleigh R. (2014) Turbidity Maximum Entrapment of Phytoplankton in the Chesapeake Bay. Estuaries and Coasts, 37 . pp. 279-298. DOI 10.1007/s12237-013-9692-2.

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Supplementary data:

Abstract

Estuarine turbidity maxima (ETM) play an impor- tant role in zooplankton and larval fish productivity in many estuaries. Yet in many of these systems, little is known about the food web that supports this secondary production. To see if phytoplankton have the potential to be a component of the ETM food web in the Chesapeake Bay estuary a series of cruises were carried out to determine the biomass distribution and floral composition of phytoplankton in and around the ETM during the winter and spring using fluorometry, high- performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and microscopy. Two distinct phytoplankton communities were observed along the salinity gradient. In lower salinity waters, biomass was low and the community was composed mostly of diatoms, while in more saline waters biomass was high and the community was composed mostly of mixotrophic dinoflagellates, which were often concentrated in a thin layer below the pycnocline. Phytoplankton biomass was always low in the ETM, but high concentrations of phytoplankton pigment degradation products and cellular remains were often observed suggesting that this was an area of high phytoplankton mortality and/or an area where phytoplankton derived particulate organic matter was being trapped. These results, along with a box model analysis, suggest that under certain hydrodynamic conditions phyto- plankton derived organic matter can be trapped in ETM and potentially play a role in fueling secondary production.

Document Type: Article
Additional Information: WOS:000334170400003
Keywords: Estuarine turbidity maxima, Chesapeake Bay, HPLC, Phytoplankton
Research affiliation: OceanRep > GEOMAR > FB2 Marine Biogeochemistry > FB2-BM Biogeochemical Modeling
Refereed: Yes
Open Access Journal?: No
DOI etc.: 10.1007/s12237-013-9692-2
ISSN: 1559-2723
Date Deposited: 24 Apr 2014 10:24
Last Modified: 22 Dec 2016 09:47
URI: http://oceanrep.geomar.de/id/eprint/24144

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