Heavy-Metal-Resistant Microorganisms in Deep-Sea Sediments Disturbed by Mining Activity: An Application Toward the Development of Experimental in vitro Systems.

Gillard, Benjamin, Chatzievangelou, Damianos, Thomsen, Laurenz and Ullrich, Matthias S. (2019) Heavy-Metal-Resistant Microorganisms in Deep-Sea Sediments Disturbed by Mining Activity: An Application Toward the Development of Experimental in vitro Systems. Open Access Frontiers in Marine Science, 6 (462). DOI 10.3389/fmars.2019.00462.

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Abstract

Future mining of polymetallic nodules in the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Northeastern Pacific) is expected to affect all benthic ecosystems. The diversity, distribution, and environmental functions of microorganisms inhabiting abyssal sediments are barely understood. To understand consequences of deep-sea mining, experimental in vitro systems needs to be established to test hypotheses on the environmental impact of mining. For this, 40 bacterial strains, belonging to proteobacteria, actinobacteria and firmicutes were isolated from deep-sea sediments and nodules sampled at depths of ≥ 4000 m. Phenotypic characterization revealed a strong inter-species and moderate intra-species variability. Determination of metal minimum inhibitory concentrations indicated the presence of acute manganese-resistant bacteria such as Rhodococcus erythropolis (228.9 mM), Loktanella cinnabarina (57.2 mM), and Dietzia maris (14.3 mM) that might be suitable systems for testing the effects of release of microbes from nodules and their interactions with sediment particles in plumes generated during mining. Comparative genomic analysis indicated the presence of manganese efflux systems relevant for future transcriptomics or proteomics approaches with environmental samples and might serve in paving the way to develop model systems including representative organisms which are currently not cultivable. Monitoring deep-sea mining activity at abyssal depth is a challenge that has to be tackled. We proposed the use of API strips as a fast on-board methodology for bacterial monitoring as an indicator for sediment plume dispersions within the water column.

Document Type: Article
Keywords: deep-sea mining, CCZ, sediment, bacteria, heavy metal, API strips
Refereed: Yes
Open Access Journal?: Yes
DOI etc.: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00462
ISSN: 2296-7745
Projects: JPIO-MiningImpact
Expeditions/Models/Experiments:
Date Deposited: 07 Jan 2021 13:31
Last Modified: 08 Feb 2021 07:38
URI: http://oceanrep.geomar.de/id/eprint/51443

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